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Eltham Park North

Eltham Park North

After one of the wettest winters on record its good to see that parts of the Green Chain Walk are again in bloom. The cherry blossom in Eltham Park is, this year, truly magnificent. In Japan the blossom is a metaphor for the ephemeral nature of life and is celebrated in the annual festival of Hanami. After three poor blossom seasons this splash of colour against a clear blue sky is a welcome vision.

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Eltham Park North

Eltham Park North

From the park a walk into Oxleas Woods and there are more signs that spring has arrived. The woods are full of birdsong; the squeeking hinge sound of the blue tit and the squarking of the invading parakeets. The woodland flowers are awakening. The best display is the wood anemonies that have carpeted whole sections of these ancient woodlands.

Oxleas Woods

Oxleas Woods

Eltham Park North

“We must learn to walk slowly, so that we have time to see; we must learn to tread quietly, so that we do not cause alarm; above all we must think peace.”
Robert Gibbings – Sweet Thames run softly 1940

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Gothic Water Tower

Gothic Water Tower

There was a time when the well off moved away from the river unlike now when a riverside apartment is de rigueur. Back in the C19th Shooters Hill was the place for the factory owners, shipbuilders and landed gentry to build their mansions. It’s one of the highest points( 129 metres) in London and has magnificent views over to the city.

Sitting on the crest of the hill is a Victorian Gothic water tower which dominates the landscape. Opposite is the entrance to Oxleas woods: an ancient woodland thought to be one of the most important areas for wildlife in the whole of London. This wooded area dates back thousands of years so, its no surprise to know that it was a favourite haunt of highwaymen. Before entering the woods there is a wooden covered seat which looks like it has become detached from Christ Church but it is in fact a memorial to Samuel Edmund Philips (1848-1893) who had a large electrical cable factory on the Thames at Charlton. Hidden amongst the tall oak trees is an underground reservoir, the remains of Castle Wood House and Severndroog Castle.

Memorial Shooters Hill

Severndroog Castle is in fact a folly built by Lady James to commemorate her husband, Sir William James’ conquest of Severn Droog on the coast of Malabar 2nd April 1755. Now managed by the Severndroog Trust it is in the process of a complete restoration.

Severndroog Castle

Severndroog Castle


In the C17th this land belonged to Sir John Morden, who also built The College named after him in Blackheath. In 1869 Mr Barlow a ship owner leased the land and built Castle Wood House. It was demolished in 1922 a period when the gentry were on their uppers and struggling to keep their big piles going. Its shadow can still be seen in the landscape.

Castle House

Castle Wood House

Castle House

Castle Wood House

The walk through the woods is interrupted by open spaces. Look closely and you can see that they were once the gardens of Castle Wood House and they become more formal and symmetrical as you ascend. The terraces and stairs remain and from the top of these are spectacular views of London. Pieces of the original architecture provide interest with hidden arches and lichen encrusted walls.

Remains of Castle House

Remains of Castle Wood House

The underground reservoir is quite difficult to find. It’s in the area known as Oxleas Meadow.

Underground reservoir

Underground reservoir

Refreshments are available in the Oxleas Wood Cafe or The Bull. This ancient inn dates back to 1749 and was once a manor house and religious services were held there before Christ Church was built in 1854. Thankfully, it’s still a traditional boozer.

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