Royal Woolwich Dockyard

The scenes on 1st October 1869 in Woolwich must have resembled the closing of the mines in 1985. The dockyard workers raised a huge black flag on top of one of the chimneys and hung an effigy of the First Lord of the Admiralty. Over several years the dockyards had been run down as they were unable to produce the iron-clad ships needed by the navy. Nearly 3,000 men lost their jobs bringing a period of social instability to Woolwich. Almost 1,500 skilled workers emigrated to Australia and Canada.

Royal Woolwich Dockyard

Royal Woolwich Dockyard

The dockyard was developed into an military store. Ten years later Charles Dickens visited Woolwich while compiling his London Guide 1878. He commented that the Dockyard area was filled to capacity with military stores ready to be shipped to the East. This was the build up to the Second Anglo-Afghanistan war. In late 1878 British troops invaded Afghanistan from India. The site remained an important store up until the end of the First World War. It was divided into plots and began to be sold off from 1927 the last plot to be owned by the War Office was finally sold in the 1960s.

Royal Woolwich Dockyard

Royal Woolwich Dockyard

Royal Woolwich Dockyard

Royal Woolwich Dockyard

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