Deptford High Street

Deptford High Street must be one of the most written about streets in London. On a recent visit I could well see why this is the case.  The uniqueness of the shops is striking.  When most high streets have the same range of pound shops, ubiquitous bakers or even empty shops it’s refreshing to come across ones that offer something different.  The sight of, what looked like, a missile for sale outside of Absracticus immediately aroused my curiosity and I was drawn in to explore more. It turned out that this is some kind of underwater navigational system.

Around the corner from this at the bottom of Tanners Hill is a row of shops that date back to the late 17th Century.  Mr Wellbeloved a traditional butchers occupies one.  It’s name alone makes it worth a visit.  He sells steak pies that he makes on the property which are very good. In the same parade is a house that is on the recently published English Heritage At Risk list. It had previously been a cycle workshop. Further down the High Street a former bakers is also on the list.  That was built in 1791 for baker Thomas Palmer.

Deptford High Street

I started at the southern end of the High Street with its distinctive anchor.  This is the cause of some controversy as Lewisham Council have started a consultation on the development of the area that involves removing it. The anchor is a relatively new addition to the High Street.  You can buy the traditional and the exotic here.  There are two traditional pie and mash shops as well as places that you can buy large edible snails from Africa.

Deptford High Street

The high street also reflects that Deptford has a community of local and emerging artists.  There are two art galleries – Bearspace and Utrophia.

If you watched the recent BBC programme Secret History of our Streets you will know that much of the historical housing around the High Street was demolished.  Near the northern  Creek Road end of the High Street turn into Albury Street. The south side of the road has been rebuilt with modern houses but the north side still has the original eighteenth century houses.

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